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Ireland Tours & Trips

Caper across the Emerald Isle

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Travel to Ireland

 Home to both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Island, though the border has been unmarked since the signing of the Good Friday Agreement in 1998. The “Emerald Isle” earns its moniker in every inch of its 52,457 square miles—whether it’s rolling hills, forests, or farmlands. There’s always a new shade of green to discover in this lush land. Travel the Wild Atlantic Way down the west coast, catching the Connemara and Giant’s Causeway, or up the eastern side for oysters on the lively streets of Dublin.

The Ireland Experience

It’s true what they say, a Guinness tastes better in Ireland. And sure, you’ve been to an Irish pub and celebrated Saint Patrick’s Day, but nothing compares to experiencing this rich and complex land in the flesh. Whether it’s live music in a pub or a horseback ride through the wilds of the Moher Cliffs, you’ll find that in Ireland tradition is a living thing. Steep yourself in legend at the Blarney Castle—where a kiss of the stone is said to give you eloquence—then take your newfound gift of gab on a night out in Belfast to create some tall tales of your own.

Popular Attractions in Ireland

Giant’s Causeway 

Follow Shepherd’s Steps up the basalt columns of Giant’s Causeway for spectacular views of the Atlantic horizon. If the hike has you worn, then take a rest in the “Wishing Chair,” a place in the stone which has been worn into a smooth seat by hopeful travelers. Legend has it that the basalt columns of Giant’s Causeway are the remains of a bridge connecting Ireland and Scotland, built by warring giants of yesteryear.

Cliffs of Moher

Journey along the west coast to County Clare and the legendary Cliffs of Moher. Peer down from the rocky outcrop and you’ll see the swelling waters of the Atlantic Ocean 509 feet below. Over twenty bird species make their home here, so keep an eye out for puffins and peregrine falcons. As part of a UNESCO Global Park, there’s a lot to explore—so why not go on horseback?

Blarney Castle

The beautifully preserved 15th-century castle is world-famous for a single stone. The Blarney Stone is of uncertain origins but said to give the gift of eloquence to anyone brave enough to kiss it—to reach it all you have to do is hang upside down from the ramparts. See whether the charm worked on the walk around the lake. If this lush foliage doesn’t make a poet out of you, nothing will.

Connemara National Park

Once part of the Kylemore Abbey Estate, the Connemara National Park is the epitome of Irish wilderness. In just under eight square miles you’ll see bogs, heath, and woodlands, not to mention the mighty peaks of Benbaun and  Muckanaght. Explore this romantic backcountry by foot or car, keeping an eye out for grazing Connemara Ponies on your merry Atlantic way.

Dublin

A cozy capital city with an elegant Georgian flair, Dublin hugs the east coast where the River Liffey meets the Irish Sea. Of course, you’ll want to see the hits: Saint Patrick’s Cathedral, the Book of Kells, and the Jameson Distillery, but the locals or “Dubs” won’t let you leave without a heaping dish of Coddle—a sausage and potato bake—and a pint of Guinness in one of the many classic pubs. Pick one with live music.

Belfast

The capital of Northern Ireland, Belfast has managed to retain its industrial edge through its transformation into a nightlife hub. Head to the Cathedral Quarter for the best party—whether it’s a porter or a craft cocktail that you’re after. Clap along to a traditional session of Irish music and dance. The day has treasures of its own, stop by St George’s Market for a fresh bite of soda bread.

Unmissable Places in Ireland

When is the Best Time to Visit Ireland?

Visit Ireland in the spring and early summer or early autumn—April through June and September through October, respectively —for fewer crowds and pleasant temperatures in the low 50s. However, Irish weather is notoriously unpredictable so don’t be put off by a few showers. The high summer July through August is the warmest time of year, with temperatures hovering in the mid to high 60s, but it’s also the busiest, so expect some crowds. If you want the Isle to yourself, then a winter visit may be for you, a pub tour is made all the cozier by dreary weather, though some outdoor sites may be closed.



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